Tag Archives: Rush Limbaugh

Rush Passes Away; His Fight for Liberty Continues

J Robert Smith

  • Feb 17
  • 1 min read

The news of Rush Limbaugh’s passing today (February 17) is truly sad. Rush was, in many ways, the inheritor of the Regan legacy. Clearly, his was the most important conservative voice in America for a generation, which is a remarkable feat in itself. Rush’s show reached 25-30 million listeners daily. We owe him a debt of thanks and there’s really only one way to repay him.

We each must dedicate ourselves to carrying on the cause of freedom. Rush has passed the torch to us. In many small ways, we can fight for liberty in our daily lives. Millions of small actions add up to big changes, and, heaven knows, American liberty is imperiled and the nation needs an historic change of direction. Rush fought the good fight right up to the end of his very consequential life. His integrity and courage should inspire us.

May God bless Rush, and may the Good Lord grant us the strength, wisdom, and courage to win this fight for freedom.

NEWSFEED TUESDAY: The Great Rush Limbaugh

J Robert Smith

  • Feb. 4, 2020
  • 2 min read

Liberalism is a scourge. It destroys the human spirit. It destroys prosperity. It assigns sameness to everybody. And wherever I find it, I oppose it.

RUSH LIMBAUGH, interview, Playboy, November 2011 (via Notable Quotes)

THE TAKE

Rush Limbaugh announced yesterday on his show that he has Stage 4 lung cancer. The diagnosis is grim and the prognosis, iffy. But this isn’t a eulogy. One thing you learn about Rush: he’s a man of great optimism. Listening to his show for three decades, as I have, you know he’s fighter, not a quitter. If anyone can beat the odds, it’s Rush.

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NEWSFEED THURSDAY: The Radical Feminist Approach Behind Impeachment

J Robert Smith

  • Nov. 21, 2019
  • 4 min read

U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland testified that there was a “quid pro quo” between the U.S. and Ukraine, even though President Trump made it crystal clear to Sondland that there was no “quid pro quo.”

So, how did the ambassador arrive at his opinion that a “quid pro quo” must somehow exist? It turns out that he assumed or “presumed” it. At one point, he called it a mere “guess.”

The trouble with presumptions and guess-work is that they are often unreliable and sometimes quite wrong. Assumptions and suppositions, by their nature, can be risky and foolish. We should trust only in what we know that is derived from facts. This was the fatal flaw in Sondland’s narrative. [Bold added]

Gregg Jarrett, November 20, 2019

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